Different Cochlear implant devices used for hearing preservation.

There may be better methods to hearing preservation for those with cochlear implants.

Hearing aids are enough to combat mild-to-moderate damage. While this option works for a majority of people with hearing loss, it simply isn’t enough for those who have suffered trauma to their hearing nerve. In the case of nerve deafness, a cochlear implant is necessary for hearing preservation.

People with this severe degree of deafness need as much help as they can get. That’s why scientists strive to improve the technology that returns hearing to normal. Let’s look at the latest study from the Mount Sinai Hospital, which narrows down the best practice for cochlear implants.

Hearing Preservation: Finding the Better Option

Cochlear implants are medical devices that connect directly to the auditory ear. By bypassing the damaged structures of the inner ear, the implant can improve the hearing of people with severe hearing loss. They help more than 188,000 people worldwide.

Lead investigator and researcher at Mount Sinai, George Wanna, MD, Site Chair, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) and Mount Sinai Beth Israel, found that a certain design of cochlear implants worked better than others. After examining 230 patients with every type of cochlear implant, Dr. Wanna’s team of researchers discovered that implants without wires in the electrode worked best.

These implants are called lateral wall electrodes. Not only do they provide better hearing for those wearing them but they do less damage to the ear. The device is less likely to cause internal fractures to the inner ear, making it less traumatic. In order to prove this point even further, the team tested several different brands of the same cochlear implant, finding the same results.

Dr. Wanna had this to say about the study, “”This is the largest clinical study done in the world on conventional electrodes and will have major implications for doctors and their patients who need their long-term hearing restored. This study is a breakthrough for patients with hearing loss, and improvements in practice and techniques will allow them to enjoy many hearing benefits such as music enjoyment, listening in complex environments, and sound localization.”

Other Findings

The research team at Mount Sinai also made another important discovery – the best surgical approach to inserting the cochlear implant. Most implants are surgically inserted under the skin and behind the ear by drilling through the bone. What the research team found was that other options, without drilling through the bone were better.

The two surgical approaches the team examined are called the “round window” and “cochleostomy.” The round window approach involves surgeons opening the membrane without removing the bone or drilling into the inner ear. On the other hand, the cochleostomy approach does drill into the bone.

“The cochleostomy approach causes fibrosis and scarring, leading to hearing loss over time,” said Dr. Wanna. “Our results also revealed that using oral steroids also helped in the long term to preserve hearing by preventing inflammation.”

Dr. Wanna and his team hope surgeons will put this information to good. This research can help by giving patients the best implants available for hearing preservation. “This is an exciting time in this field, and the advancement in hearing technology and continued improvements in techniques and outcomes will benefit patients and their families,” said Dr. Wanna.